Hadassah

Hadassah Researchers Develop Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines Suitable for Humans

Tuesday, Jun 26 2012

Researchers at the Hadassah University Medical Organization in Jerusalem have produced, for the first time, under Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) conditions, lines of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) for transplantation that are free of animal components.

As the researchers explain: "Most of the reported hESC lines worldwide are not ideal for use in clinical trials. They were developed without adherence to Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs), using animal-derived research-grade reagents, which may infect the cells with animal pathogens. Moreover, many cell lines were derived and cultured on animal feeder cells, which may contaminate the hESCs by nonhuman sialic acid Neu5Gc molecules, which can elicit immune rejection after transplantation."

Human embryonic stem cells can differentiate and mature into any cell type in the human body. This gives them the potential to serve as an infinite source of cells for transplantation to mitigate degenerative diseases such as diabetes, heart failure, and Parkinson's.

The new stem cell lines were produced from six-day-old embryos donated by couples who had completed their in vitro fertilization treatments. After reviewing the ethical procedures involved in the embryo donation and the production of the stem cells, both Israel's Ministry of Health and the United States National Institutes of Health (NIH) found them appropriate and granted ethical approval. The NIH approval allows researchers in the United States to use these new cell lines in studies funded by the federal government.

Prof. Benjamin Reubinoff, Director of the Sidney and Judy Swartz Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research Center, headed the study, which is highlighted in the June 20, 2012 issue of PLoS ONE, an international, peer-reviewed, open-access, online publication of the Public Library of Science. The cell lines have already been provided to two Israeli companies: Cell Cure Neurosciences Ltd.--to develop transplantation treatment for Age-Related Macular Degeneration--and Kadimastem Ltd. for diabetes. Hadasit, Hadassah's technology transfer company, commercialized the new technology by awarding licenses to the two companies and is overseeing the translational process.

The study was partially conducted by the Bereshit Consortium, a group of companies and academic institutions funded by Israel's Ministry of Industry, Trade and Labor to advance the development of stem cell transplantations.

Read the story in The Jerusalem Post here. 

Comments

No comments yet.
First Name
Email
Comment
Enter this word:

Related Stories

alt_text

Wednesday, Nov 30 2016

Hadassah Teams Up with Spinal Cord Institute to Study Outcomes of Traumatic Injuries

The medical interventions and outcomes for Israelis with a spinal cord injury (SCI) will now be captured in the Rick Hansen SCI Registry (RHSCIR), thanks to the November 16th launch of a partnership between the Hadassah Medical Organization and the Rick Hansen Institute (RHI), a Canadian-based not-for-profit organization named after the paralympic athlete who suffered a severe spinal cord injury following a car accident.

READ MORE ›
alt_text

Thursday, Nov 17 2016

A Birthday Party in Hadassah’s PICU: Helping a Four-Year-Old Recover

Yehoshua "Shuki" Pepper was crossing a Jerusalem street with an older sibling when a car ran him over. He was rushed to Hadassah Hospital Ein Kerem's Pediatric Intensive Care Unit in fair condition, but he wasn't speaking and subsequent MRIs of his head injury were worrisome.

READ MORE ›
alt_text

Thursday, Nov 17 2016

Ethiopian Pre-Nursing Students: On the Way to Fulfilling a Dream

“I know that some people are fine with looking at a screen all day, but I know I need the human touch--to work with people. I want to be a nurse, " relates Sarah Talala, one of the 18 students of Ethiopian background who were given the opportunity to take a course which enabled them to advance to pre-academic studies at the Hebrew University and then on to nursing school at the Hadassah-Hebrew University Henrietta Szold School of Nursing.

READ MORE ›
alt_text

Monday, Nov 14 2016

Granalix BioTechnologies Introduces Food Additive to Protect Against Neurodegenerative Disease

Granalix BioTechnologies, whose founder and Chief Executive Officer is Hadassah Medical Organization Experimental Neurologist Prof. Ruth Gabizon, has launched a food supplement containing pomegranate oil that has proven to protect against neurodegenerative diseases in pre-clinical models.

READ MORE ›

Contact Us

40 Wall Street

New York, NY 10005

support@hadassah.org

More ›

Membership Questions

membership@hadassah.org

(800) 664-5646

Donation Questions

donorservices@hadassah.org

(800) 928-0685

Missions Department

missions@hadassah.org

(800) 237-1517

Show More