Home > Read about it > News Round Up

Search Hadassah News

Search Hadassah News, hMedicine and hCoast-to-Coast archives:   

National President Marcie Natan Strengthens Hadassah's Bond with Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC)

Why did the Cincinnati Chapter of Hadassah keep stating, as in the story of Passover, that this year would be different than all other years for Hadassah members?

Because this year, as part of their annual fundraising events, they brought in National President Marcie Natan, as the guest speaker at three events and had her meet personally with other Hadassah supporters in the community. She also toured Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) and heard from CCHMC doctors, including one Hadassah doctor in the United States working and studying for three years, about the incredible benefits to CCHMC and the two Hadassah Hospitals in Jerusalem brought about by the Israel Exchange Program (IEP). This was capped off by Councilmen P.G. Sittenfeld giving Marcie and Chapter President Bonnie Juran Ullner a Proclamation signed by the mayor proclaiming it Hadassah Day in Cincinnati on April 25, 2013.

A tremendous amount was accomplished in the two whirlwind days Marcie Natan spent in Cincinnati. At the Major Gifts elegant evening dessert reception in Hyde Park on the evening of April 24, Marcie was able to share, in an intimate setting with the approximately 50 attendees, the many successes and advances by Hadassah in patient research and care. She described in detail the new Sarah Wetsman Davidson Hospital Tower that provides state-of-the-art care to patients, similar to what she observed at CCHMC the next day. She said the total cost of the tower is $361 million and while already open, there is approximately $50 million left to raise. She also described how there are 14 floors above ground and five floors underground, due to a new law in Israel so the hospital can function even while under attack.

Marcie also shared some of the recent research emanating from Hadassah. In an interview on Channel 9 news the next day, she spoke of how Hadassah was able to continue with stem cell research when it was banned in this country, and is thus ahead of the curve in advancing the use of this type of treatment.

She also discussed, throughout the two days, the recent advances in operating on patients with liver cancer who were until this time considered inoperable. The Hadassah University Medical Center has pioneered a new treatment for liver cancer, using a direct flow of high-voltage electric current to destroy a malignant tumor. Typically, a cancerous growth in the liver proves fatal, because the cancerous growth is attached to blood vessels and thus difficult to reach and remove, but this new procedure offers hope to those suffering from liver cancer.

The new procedure--"Irreversible Electroporation" -- does not generate excessive heat or cold in the body and can therefore be applied close to blood vessels and vital organs without harming them," explains Dr. Mouhammad Faroja, a Hadassah senior surgeon, who learned the procedure at London's Hammersmith Hospital. Requiring just a few minutes under anesthesia, Hadassah's first patient to receive the treatment was deemed a complete success, and the patient left with only a few scars where the tumor had been, and has already returned to work.


One of the patients Dr. Rivkind was not able to save was a 21-year old named Shiri Negari who came into the hospital after a bomb blast and appeared unhurt and coherent, and yet 45 minutes later she was dead. What the Hadassah doctors learned from Shiri's death in 2002 was that an enclosed bomb blast, such as in a bus, can cause massive internal injuries that are not apparent to the naked eye. Thus they have forever changed the protocol of how they treat bus bomb patients, based on the gut-wrenching loss of Shiri Negari.

After Marcie was finished speaking, the young female Hadassah doctor who is currently at CCHMC studying adolescent medicine with Dr. Jessica Kahn for three years, unexpectedly got up to speak and share with the crowd her personal story. This young Hadassah doctor, Dr. Shelly Negari, shared the story about her younger sister, Shiri Negari. She told the attendees the story of her younger sister Shiri, and the events surrounding the day of the bus bombing; how she in fact did not survive a bomb blast like the one in Boston recently, and how this in turn has given Shelly the drive to be the best doctor possible. She said also that the room in which Shiri died at Hadassah hospital is now a room in which she delivers babies; thus it has gone from darkness to light for her and yet, Shelly always thinks of her sister every time she passes the threshold of the room.

When Dr. Negari finished, a four-time founder of the Cincinnati chapter rose to say how very moved she was by the entire evening and then announced her pledge to become a Centennial Founder, in memory of Shiri Negari.

Marcie mentioned a few times throughout the two days the immediate and overwhelming response to the Sandy Hook tragedy by Hadassah members worldwide. The mother of Noah Pozner, one of the Jewish victims, asked that those who were so inclined plant trees in Israel in Noah's memory. Marcie said the response was beyond overwhelming and through Hadassah's partner organization JNF, thousands of trees will be planted in memory of Noah and the other 19 victims.

She also spoke of the recent tragedy in Boston, and how she was on a Hadassah Medical Organization conference call with Dr. Kevin Taub, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts, when the bombings occurred. The BI, as it is referred to locally, is the hospital to which many of the victims were taken, as well as the two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings.

Dr. Taub, whose Hebrew name is Ian, was a commissioned officer, and served as a combat physician in the Israeli Defense Forces in the 1980′s. Therefore he is familiar with two things that most American physicians are not: dealing with large numbers of traumatic injury victims being brought into his hospital following a terrorist bombing, and treating victims and suspected terrorists in the same place at the same time and with the same level of care.

Massachusetts General Hospital, which also treated many of the injured victims, reported that they were immeasurably more prepared for the massive number of casualties in a short span of time, due to the training they received eight years ago when Israeli doctors and nurses spent two days at the hospital teaching the staff the methods pioneered in Israel.

Techniques that were routine in Israel by 2005, and which helped save lives in Boston last week, began evolving in the 1990s, when Israel experienced a spate of bus bombings. Israeli doctors "rewrote the Bible of blast trauma," said Avi Rivkind, the director of surgery at Jerusalem's Hadassah Medical Center, where 60 percent of Israeli victims have been treated.

One of the patients Dr. Rivkind was not able to save was a 21-year old named Shiri Negari who came into the hospital after a bomb blast and appeared unhurt and coherent, and yet 45 minutes later she was dead. What the Hadassah doctors learned from Shiri's death in 2002 was that an enclosed bomb blast, such as in a bus, can cause massive internal injuries that are not apparent to the naked eye. Thus they have forever changed the protocol of how they treat bus bomb patients, based on the gut-wrenching loss of Shiri Negari.

After Marcie was finished speaking, the young female Hadassah doctor who is currently at CCHMC studying adolescent medicine with Dr. Jessica Kahn for three years, unexpectedly got up to speak and share with the crowd her personal story. This young Hadassah doctor, Dr. Shelly Negari, shared the story about her younger sister, Shiri Negari. She told the attendees the story of her younger sister Shiri, and the events surrounding the day of the bus bombing; how she in fact did not survive a bomb blast like the one in Boston recently, and how this in turn has given Shelly the drive to be the best doctor possible. She said also that the room in which Shiri died at Hadassah hospital is now a room in which she delivers babies; thus it has gone from darkness to light for her and yet, Shelly always thinks of her sister every time she passes the threshold of the room.

When Dr. Negari finished, a four-time founder of the Cincinnati chapter rose to say how very moved she was by the entire evening and then announced her pledge to become a Centennial Founder, in memory of Shiri Negari.

Related Stories in the Press:

Hadassah president's visit highlights hospital's partnership with Israel
—WCPO-TV Cincinnati

Date: 5/1/2013 12:00:00 AM

Hadassah Weekly Briefing

Read the most recent edition of the Hadassah Weekly Briefing including Jewish News from around the world and Hadassah News from the Hospital, College, Hadassah International, and more

Get it in your Inbox!

Some of our most popular
National news stories

   |  Who We Are  |  What We Do  |  Where We Do It  |  Read About It  |  Join Now  |  Donate  |
  |  Login  |  Contact Us  |  Careers  |  Terms & Conditions  |  
Copyright ©2014 Hadassah is a registered trademark of Hadassah, the Women's Zionist Organization of America