Hadassah

Placental Cells Found to Have Potential to Mitigate Acute Radiation Syndrome

Monday, Oct 24 2011

"In pre-clinical studies," notes Prof. Raphael Gorodetsky, head of the Biotechnology and Radiobiology Laboratory at the Sharrett Institute of Oncology at Hadassah University Medical Center, "we found that placental-derived cells potentially have the ability to increase the survival rate of animals following exposure to lethal doses of total body irradiation."

These placental (PLX) cells, developed by Pluristem Therapeutics Inc., treat life-threatening complications associated with Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS).

During the studies, animals were injected intravenously with either PLX cells or a placebo, on the day after being exposed to lethal doses of radiation. Nine days following treatment with the PLX cells, the animals' bone marrow and spleen were examined for signs of hematopoietic (blood forming) tissue. On day 23, bone marrow and blood samples were examined in the surviving animals. Overall survival and body weight changes were also monitored. The researchers found in the animals treated with the PLX cells:

  • an up to four-fold increase in the survival rate accompanied by a corresponding weight regain
  • an increase in red-cell count on days 21-23
  • an elevated number of hematopoietic colonies on day 9

Over the next few months, Prof. Gorodetsky and his team will focus on better understanding the PLX cells' mechanism of action as an "off the shelf" post radiation treatment, which could potentially be used in the future for treating ARS patients.

"While our experiments using PLX cells in treating radiation exposure are ongoing and still evolving, these initial data are very encouraging," said Zami Aberman, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Pluristem. "PLX cells as a sole treatment may potentially enhance the survival of lethally irradiated individuals. Moreover, since our previous work indicated that PLX cells can enhance the engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells from cord blood, we can offer a multifaceted approach to reduce and treat the destruction of bone marrow that occurs following exposure to high-dose ionizing radiation. Stockpiled PLX cells can be administered acutely and as a bridging therapy to protect the bone marrow."

Related Stories

alt_text

Thursday, Oct 10 2019

Hadassah Leads International Study on Changing Intensive Care Practices on End-of-Life Decisions

Intensive care teams the world over deal daily with matters of life and death.

READ MORE ›
alt_text

Thursday, Oct 10 2019

Devastating Diagnosis, But Options for Optimism

A 26-year-old woman we can call Miriam is a wife and a mother, with a lively toddler. One recent day, she noticed a small lump in her breast.

READ MORE ›
alt_text

Tuesday, Oct 8 2019

From the Heart: Reflections Upon Retirement

Prof. Chaim Lotan has just completed two decades as director of Hadassah’s Heart Institute...

READ MORE ›
alt_text

Tuesday, Oct 8 2019

Intervening at the End of Life: What Has Changed?

On Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, as Jews the world over confront the uncertainty of their personal futures and chant the somber holiday prayer Unetaneh Tokef...

READ MORE ›
SUPPORT HADASSAH HOSPITALS

Learn more about the Hadassah Medical Organization.

Donation Questions

donorservices@hadassah.org

(800) 928-0685

Membership Questions

membership@hadassah.org

(800) 664-5646

Missions Department

missions@hadassah.org

(800) 237-1517

Contact Us

40 Wall Street

New York, NY 10005

support@hadassah.org

More ›

Show More