• 1912: Hadassah, The Women’s Zionist Organization of America is founded by Henrietta Szold.

  • 1913: Two Hadassah nurses, Rose Kaplan and Rae Landy, travel to Palestine to provide maternity care and treat trachoma, a serious, widespread eye disease in the Middle East.

  • 1918: Hadassah establishes the American Zionist Medical Unit (AZMU) — renamed Hadassah Medical Organization in 1924 — to create permanent health and welfare programs in postwar Palestine.

  • 1918: Hadassah’s Nurses’ Training School is founded in Palestine to train local personnel and establish a strong base of nurses.

  • 1933: Youth Aliyah is founded and Henrietta Szold is appointed as its first Director, working with a German colleague to help Jewish children leave Nazi Germany and resettle in Palestine before and during the Holocaust.

  • 1939: The Rothschild-Hadassah University Hospital, the first teaching and medical center in Palestine, opens on Mount Scopus.

  • 1940: Hadassah becomes Young Judaea’s co-sponsor.

  • 1942: Hadassah mobilizes to support the American war effort during WWII, establishing blood banks, selling war bonds and volunteering.

  • 1947: The UN’s partition plan calls for independent Jewish and Arab enclaves in Palestine, making it dangerous for Hadassah medical staff to travel to Mount Scopus.

  • 1948: While traveling to Mount Scopus, a medical convoy is attacked, killing 78 people and forcing Hadassah to evacuate its facilities on Mount Scopus to protect staff and patients. Hadassah’s access to Mount Scopus is lost for the next 19 years.

  • 1948: As the State of Israel is born, Hadassah Medical Organization cares for thousands of wounded soldiers in Jerusalem.

  • 1952: A groundbreaking is held for Hadassah’s new medical center in Ein Kerem. Hadassah Hospital Ein Kerem officially opens on June 6, 1961.

  • 1962: Hadassah celebrates its 50th anniversary with the dedication of the Fannie and Maxwell Abbell Synagogue at Hadassah Hospital Ein Kerem, which features Marc Chagall’s magnificent 12 stained glass windows.

  • 1967: Hadassah Associates is founded to give American men the opportunity to support Hadassah’s work.

  • 1967: After the Six-Day War and the reunification of Jerusalem, Hadassah National President Charlotte Jacobson travels to Mount Scopus to receive the keys to the hospital, marking the reunification between Hadassah Hospital Mount Scopus and Hadassah Hospital Ein Kerem.

  • 1975: Hadassah rededicates the rebuilt and renovated Hadassah Hospital Mount Scopus.

  • 1988: USAID invites Hadassah Medical Organization medical staff to help construct and open a new hospital in Kinshasa, Zaire, while Hadassah advocates for expanded treatment and funding for research to help people infected with AIDS in the US.

  • 1999: During the National Convention in Washington, DC, Hadassah holds its largest “Day on the Hill” event ever with 2,000 delegates visiting Capitol Hill to make their voices heard to US senators and representatives.

  • 2001: Hadassah is recognized by the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) as a non-governmental organization (NGO), enabling Hadassah to lend its medical and social expertise internationally.

  • 2005: Hadassah’s hospitals in Jerusalem are nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize for building bridges to peace through medicine.

  • 2012: Hadassah celebrates its centennial in Jerusalem and opens the state-of-the-art Sarah Wetsman Davidson Hospital Tower.

  • 2017:  Hadassah marks the celebration of two 50th anniversaries: the reunification of Jerusalem and the reunification of Hadassah’s hospitals.

  • 2018: Hadassah celebrates the 100th Anniversary of the Henrietta Szold Hadassah-Hebrew University School of Nursing, the Hadassah Medical Organization and the Hadassah Department of Ophthalmology

  • 2019: Congress passes and the President of the United States signs the Never Again Education Act into law. Hadassah was one of the leading not-for-profit organizations championing this bill.
  • 2020: Rhoda Smolow becomes the 27th National President of Hadassah.

  • 1912: Hadassah, The Women’s Zionist Organization of America is founded by Henrietta Szold.

  • 1913: Two Hadassah nurses, Rose Kaplan and Rae Landy, travel to Palestine to provide maternity care and treat trachoma, a serious, widespread eye disease in the Middle East.

  • 1918: Hadassah establishes the American Zionist Medical Unit (AZMU) — renamed Hadassah Medical Organization in 1924 — to create permanent health and welfare programs in postwar Palestine.

  • 1918: Hadassah’s Nurses’ Training School is founded in Palestine to train local personnel and establish a strong base of nurses.

  • 1933: Youth Aliyah is founded and Henrietta Szold is appointed as its first Director, working with a German colleague to help Jewish children leave Nazi Germany and resettle in Palestine before and during the Holocaust.

  • 1939: The Rothschild-Hadassah University Hospital, the first teaching and medical center in Palestine, opens on Mount Scopus.

  • 1940: Hadassah becomes Young Judaea’s co-sponsor.

  • 1942: Hadassah mobilizes to support the American war effort during WWII, establishing blood banks, selling war bonds and volunteering.

  • 1947: The UN’s partition plan calls for independent Jewish and Arab enclaves in Palestine, making it dangerous for Hadassah medical staff to travel to Mount Scopus.

  • 1948: While traveling to Mount Scopus, a medical convoy is attacked, killing 78 people and forcing Hadassah to evacuate its facilities on Mount Scopus to protect staff and patients. Hadassah’s access to Mount Scopus is lost for the next 19 years.

  • 1948: As the State of Israel is born, Hadassah Medical Organization cares for thousands of wounded soldiers in Jerusalem.

  • 1952: A groundbreaking is held for Hadassah’s new medical center in Ein Kerem. Hadassah Hospital Ein Kerem officially opens on June 6, 1961.

  • 1962: Hadassah celebrates its 50th anniversary with the dedication of the Fannie and Maxwell Abbell Synagogue at Hadassah Hospital Ein Kerem, which features Marc Chagall’s magnificent 12 stained glass windows.

  • 1967: Hadassah Associates is founded to give American men the opportunity to support Hadassah’s work.

  • 1967: After the Six-Day War and the reunification of Jerusalem, Hadassah National President Charlotte Jacobson travels to Mount Scopus to receive the keys to the hospital, marking the reunification between Hadassah Hospital Mount Scopus and Hadassah Hospital Ein Kerem.

  • 1975: Hadassah rededicates the rebuilt and renovated Hadassah Hospital Mount Scopus.

  • 1988: USAID invites Hadassah Medical Organization medical staff to help construct and open a new hospital in Kinshasa, Zaire, while Hadassah advocates for expanded treatment and funding for research to help people infected with AIDS in the US.

  • 1999: During the National Convention in Washington, DC, Hadassah holds its largest “Day on the Hill” event ever with 2,000 delegates visiting Capitol Hill to make their voices heard to US senators and representatives.

  • 2001: Hadassah is recognized by the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) as a non-governmental organization (NGO), enabling Hadassah to lend its medical and social expertise internationally.

  • 2005: Hadassah’s hospitals in Jerusalem are nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize for building bridges to peace through medicine.

  • 2012: Hadassah celebrates its centennial in Jerusalem and opens the state-of-the-art Sarah Wetsman Davidson Hospital Tower.

  • 2017:  Hadassah marks the celebration of two 50th anniversaries: the reunification of Jerusalem and the reunification of Hadassah’s hospitals.

  • 2018: Hadassah celebrates the 100th Anniversary of the Henrietta Szold Hadassah-Hebrew University School of Nursing, the Hadassah Medical Organization and the Hadassah Department of Ophthalmology

  • 2019: Congress passes and the President of the United States signs the Never Again Education Act into law. Hadassah was one of the leading not-for-profit organizations championing this bill.
  • 2020: Rhoda Smolow becomes the 27th National President of Hadassah.

  • 1912: Hadassah, The Women’s Zionist Organization of America is founded by Henrietta Szold.

  • 1913: Two Hadassah nurses, Rose Kaplan and Rae Landy, travel to Palestine to provide maternity care and treat trachoma, a serious, widespread eye disease in the Middle East.

  • 1918: Hadassah establishes the American Zionist Medical Unit (AZMU) — renamed Hadassah Medical Organization in 1924 — to create permanent health and welfare programs in postwar Palestine.

  • 1918: Hadassah’s Nurses’ Training School is founded in Palestine to train local personnel and establish a strong base of nurses.

  • 1933: Youth Aliyah is founded and Henrietta Szold is appointed as its first Director, working with a German colleague to help Jewish children leave Nazi Germany and resettle in Palestine before and during the Holocaust.

  • 1939: The Rothschild-Hadassah University Hospital, the first teaching and medical center in Palestine, opens on Mount Scopus.

  • 1940: Hadassah becomes Young Judaea’s co-sponsor.

  • 1942: Hadassah mobilizes to support the American war effort during WWII, establishing blood banks, selling war bonds and volunteering.

  • 1947: The UN’s partition plan calls for independent Jewish and Arab enclaves in Palestine, making it dangerous for Hadassah medical staff to travel to Mount Scopus.

  • 1948: While traveling to Mount Scopus, a medical convoy is attacked, killing 78 people and forcing Hadassah to evacuate its facilities on Mount Scopus to protect staff and patients. Hadassah’s access to Mount Scopus is lost for the next 19 years.

  • 1948: As the State of Israel is born, Hadassah Medical Organization cares for thousands of wounded soldiers in Jerusalem.

  • 1952: A groundbreaking is held for Hadassah’s new medical center in Ein Kerem. Hadassah Hospital Ein Kerem officially opens on June 6, 1961.

  • 1962: Hadassah celebrates its 50th anniversary with the dedication of the Fannie and Maxwell Abbell Synagogue at Hadassah Hospital Ein Kerem, which features Marc Chagall’s magnificent 12 stained glass windows.

  • 1967: Hadassah Associates is founded to give American men the opportunity to support Hadassah’s work.

  • 1967: After the Six-Day War and the reunification of Jerusalem, Hadassah National President Charlotte Jacobson travels to Mount Scopus to receive the keys to the hospital, marking the reunification between Hadassah Hospital Mount Scopus and Hadassah Hospital Ein Kerem.

  • 1975: Hadassah rededicates the rebuilt and renovated Hadassah Hospital Mount Scopus.

  • 1988: USAID invites Hadassah Medical Organization medical staff to help construct and open a new hospital in Kinshasa, Zaire, while Hadassah advocates for expanded treatment and funding for research to help people infected with AIDS in the US.

  • 1999: During the National Convention in Washington, DC, Hadassah holds its largest “Day on the Hill” event ever with 2,000 delegates visiting Capitol Hill to make their voices heard to US senators and representatives.

  • 2001: Hadassah is recognized by the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) as a non-governmental organization (NGO), enabling Hadassah to lend its medical and social expertise internationally.

  • 2005: Hadassah’s hospitals in Jerusalem are nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize for building bridges to peace through medicine.

  • 2012: Hadassah celebrates its centennial in Jerusalem and opens the state-of-the-art Sarah Wetsman Davidson Hospital Tower.

  • 2017:  Hadassah marks the celebration of two 50th anniversaries: the reunification of Jerusalem and the reunification of Hadassah’s hospitals.

  • 2018: Hadassah celebrates the 100th Anniversary of the Henrietta Szold Hadassah-Hebrew University School of Nursing, the Hadassah Medical Organization and the Hadassah Department of Ophthalmology

  • 2019: Congress passes and the President of the United States signs the Never Again Education Act into law. Hadassah was one of the leading not-for-profit organizations championing this bill.
  • 2020: Rhoda Smolow becomes the 27th National President of Hadassah.

  • 1912: Hadassah, The Women’s Zionist Organization of America is founded by Henrietta Szold.

  • 1913: Two Hadassah nurses, Rose Kaplan and Rae Landy, travel to Palestine to provide maternity care and treat trachoma, a serious, widespread eye disease in the Middle East.

  • 1918: Hadassah establishes the American Zionist Medical Unit (AZMU) — renamed Hadassah Medical Organization in 1924 — to create permanent health and welfare programs in postwar Palestine.

  • 1918: Hadassah’s Nurses’ Training School is founded in Palestine to train local personnel and establish a strong base of nurses.

  • 1933: Youth Aliyah is founded and Henrietta Szold is appointed as its first Director, working with a German colleague to help Jewish children leave Nazi Germany and resettle in Palestine before and during the Holocaust.

  • 1939: The Rothschild-Hadassah University Hospital, the first teaching and medical center in Palestine, opens on Mount Scopus.

  • 1940: Hadassah becomes Young Judaea’s co-sponsor.

  • 1942: Hadassah mobilizes to support the American war effort during WWII, establishing blood banks, selling war bonds and volunteering.

  • 1947: The UN’s partition plan calls for independent Jewish and Arab enclaves in Palestine, making it dangerous for Hadassah medical staff to travel to Mount Scopus.

  • 1948: While traveling to Mount Scopus, a medical convoy is attacked, killing 78 people and forcing Hadassah to evacuate its facilities on Mount Scopus to protect staff and patients. Hadassah’s access to Mount Scopus is lost for the next 19 years.

  • 1948: As the State of Israel is born, Hadassah Medical Organization cares for thousands of wounded soldiers in Jerusalem.

  • 1952: A groundbreaking is held for Hadassah’s new medical center in Ein Kerem. Hadassah Hospital Ein Kerem officially opens on June 6, 1961.

  • 1962: Hadassah celebrates its 50th anniversary with the dedication of the Fannie and Maxwell Abbell Synagogue at Hadassah Hospital Ein Kerem, which features Marc Chagall’s magnificent 12 stained glass windows.

  • 1967: Hadassah Associates is founded to give American men the opportunity to support Hadassah’s work.

  • 1967: After the Six-Day War and the reunification of Jerusalem, Hadassah National President Charlotte Jacobson travels to Mount Scopus to receive the keys to the hospital, marking the reunification between Hadassah Hospital Mount Scopus and Hadassah Hospital Ein Kerem.

  • 1975: Hadassah rededicates the rebuilt and renovated Hadassah Hospital Mount Scopus.

  • 1988: USAID invites Hadassah Medical Organization medical staff to help construct and open a new hospital in Kinshasa, Zaire, while Hadassah advocates for expanded treatment and funding for research to help people infected with AIDS in the US.

  • 1999: During the National Convention in Washington, DC, Hadassah holds its largest “Day on the Hill” event ever with 2,000 delegates visiting Capitol Hill to make their voices heard to US senators and representatives.

  • 2001: Hadassah is recognized by the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) as a non-governmental organization (NGO), enabling Hadassah to lend its medical and social expertise internationally.

  • 2005: Hadassah’s hospitals in Jerusalem are nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize for building bridges to peace through medicine.

  • 2012: Hadassah celebrates its centennial in Jerusalem and opens the state-of-the-art Sarah Wetsman Davidson Hospital Tower.

  • 2017:  Hadassah marks the celebration of two 50th anniversaries: the reunification of Jerusalem and the reunification of Hadassah’s hospitals.

  • 2018: Hadassah celebrates the 100th Anniversary of the Henrietta Szold Hadassah-Hebrew University School of Nursing, the Hadassah Medical Organization and the Hadassah Department of Ophthalmology

  • 2019: Congress passes and the President of the United States signs the Never Again Education Act into law. Hadassah was one of the leading not-for-profit organizations championing this bill.
  • 2020: Rhoda Smolow becomes the 27th National President of Hadassah.

No items found.